EIGHTH – TWELFTH GRADE

EIGHTH GRADE

Our eighth grade program helps students prepare for the transition into high school, with all of the excitement and challenges that experience brings.  Students will discuss a wide range of topics, from the changing impact of technology to healthy relationships to preparing for college.  This program meets approximately once per month.

By the end of the year, eighth grade students who attend regularly should be able to:

  • Articulate the impact of clearly understanding rules and expectations.
  • Evaluate their interpersonal relationships and acknowledge helpful and hurtful people in their lives.
  • Differentiate between consent and “everything else.”
  • Give examples of how people curate their public image of self.
  • List at least three methods for coping with something stressful or depressing that would work for them.

ROSH HODESH: IT’S A GIRL THING

Each month, teen girls in this program come together for a special evening with their girlfriends and positive female role models.  Our goal is to provide them with a space for asking questions and receiving support from their peers and to help them process the big changes which are taking place in their lives.

SHEVET ACHIM

Each month, teen boys in this program come together for an evening with their male friends and positive male role models.  Each session uses four types of programming – physical, cognitive, emotive and ritual – to help teenage boys process what is happening in their lives and the world around them.

TEEN SOCIAL ACTION TRIP (9th-10th grade)

Each year we join with teens from other Los Angeles synagogues to travel around the country participating in hands on social action projects and educating ourselves about issues facing our country today. Trips in the past have been to New Orleans, Washington, D.C. and a tour of the Civil Rights movement in Alabama. Community service hours will be given for participation in this program.

By the end of the trip, students should be able to:

  • Describe the mission of the organizations they visited and explain what they do.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the complex cycle of poverty and the ways that the organizations they visited serve these needs.
  • Express the relationship between social action, social justice and Judaism.
  • Articulate something they can do to alleviate some of the challenges in our society.
  • Know the names of the other students who attended.

KEHILLAT ISRAEL TZEDAKAH TEENS (9th-10th grade)

KITT is a philanthropy program comprised of teens who are inspired to learn about challenging social issues from a Jewish perspective. Participants will be given the opportunity to decide how to responsibly give up to $20,000 to organizations that they determine are most effective in making the world a better place. Admission to KITT is by application.

By the end of the year, students who attend regularly should be able to:

  • Describe the basic process by which a board makes decisions about which grants to fund.
  • Summarize how someone might learn about where their money goes to when they make a donation to an organization.
  • Evaluate the ability of their board to follow a consensus-building model.
  • Describe the mission of the organizations their board funded and explain what the money will go towards.
  • Know the names of the other students on their board.

TEEN YOUTH GROUP (9th-12th grade)

Come hang out with your KI friends outside of the building! KI’s Youth Board will plan and run social events for all 9th-12th graders.

By the end of the year, students who attend regularly should be able to:

  • Know the names of the other students who attended.
  • Express a stronger connection to their Jewish peers and the KI community.

MADRIHIM PROGRAM (9th-12th grade)

Teens that are part of the Madrihim program assist in our weekly sessions, the Outdoor Jewish Experience, retreats, 3G, Yahad 45, and/or Haverim events. Ongoing supervision and training in leadership, classroom management and child development are part of the program. Teens earn a stipend and community service credit. Acceptance into the program is by application and an interview.

By the end of the year, students who attend regularly should be able to:

  • Know the names of the students in their class.
  • Become a reliable member of the teaching team.
  • Lead simple group activities without the aid of the teacher.

CONFIRMATION (10th-12th grade)

Confirmation students may enroll for both years, with each year culminating in a Friday Shabbat service where the students will have the opportunity to share their reflections and be presented with a certificate celebrating the confirmation of their commitment to Judaism. Conversations will revolve around the transition of preparing for college.

By the end of the year, students who attend regularly should be able to:

  • Articulate the impact of clearly understanding rules and expectations.
  • Evaluate their interpersonal relationships and acknowledge helpful and hurtful people in their lives.
  • Differentiate between consent and “everything else.”
  • Give examples of how people curate their public image of self.
  • List at least three methods for coping with something stressful or depressing that would work for them.
  • Plan how to express their views on Israel with others who disagree with them. 
  • Articulate their own religious identity and how it has developed over the years.